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To extract tannins, only water and/or alcohol are used according to the Oenological Codex. It is the proportion of water and/or alcohol used, together with the extraction temperature, that makes it possible to obtain the best extraction yields and select certain specific tannin structures.

Oenological tannins are derived from several botanical species, the oldest of which are the oak apple, chestnut wood and oak wood. In addition, other tannin-rich species can be used, such as grape skin and seeds, tea leaves, artichokes and many others. To extract tannins, only water and/or alcohol are used according to the Oenological Codex. It is the proportion of water and/or alcohol used, together with the extraction temperature, that makes it possible to obtain the best extraction yields and select certain specific tannin structures.

Oenological tannins are derived from several botanical species, the oldest of which are the oak apple, chestnut wood and oak wood. In addition, other tannin-rich species can be used, such as grape skin and seeds, tea leaves, artichokes and many others. To extract tannins, only water and/or alcohol are used according to the Oenological Codex. It is the proportion of water and/or alcohol used, together with the extraction temperature, that makes it possible to obtain the best extraction yields and select certain specific tannin structures.

Tannins
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The first factor that differentiates tannins is the chemical family to which each tannin belongs. Each family is characterised by a specific chemical structure that governs their properties.

There are three families:
– GALLOTANNINS
– ELLAGITANNINS
– PROANTHOCYANIDIC TANNINS also called condensed tannins.

Tannins can thus be classified according to their different botanical origins.
– GALLOTANNINS: oak apples (historically the first source) and tara, whose tannins are derived from the fruit.
– ELLAGITANNINS: chestnut wood and oak wood.
– PROANTHOCYANIDIC or condensed TANNINS:  grape skins and seeds, quebracho, mimosa, tea, etc.

A second factor is the chemical structure of the different families, which governs the principal oenological properties of tannins.
Families of tannins can be classified according to:
– their antioxidant and oxygen-consuming capacity.
– their capacity to protect anthocyanins during vinification.
– their ability to affect the wine’s redox potential.

To find out more, download the technical booklet.

As a result of our knowledge and expertise regarding these various properties, Martin Vialatte has formulated specific tannin preparations in order to meet the challenges facing winemakers.

A very detailed analysis of these challenges has enabled Martin Vialatte to select and adjust optimum combinations of tannin families as well as their botanical origins, thus making use of their most valuable properties.

Discover the Martin Vialatte range of tannins.

 


Martin Vialatte solutions

14 products
Tannins
Tanins de vinification

VITANIL® B

Tara tannin for the clarification of white wines.

Tanins de vinification

VITANIL® VR

A blend of condensed tannins in granulated form for the clarification and colour stabilisation of red wines.

Tanins de vinification

TANIGAL

Walnut tannins for the clarification and fining of white wines.

Tanins de vinification

TANIXEL®

Chestnut tannin in granulated form for the clarification and stabilisation of musts and wines.

SUBLIPROTECT®

A complex of condensed and hydrolysable tannins and inactivated dry yeast specifically formulated for aroma protection as well as to enhance the red wine’s oxidation-reduction potential.

VITANIL® OAK

Purified oak tannin for wine clarification and stabilisation.

Tanins d’élevage

TANIRAISIN

Grape skin tannin for wine making and maturation.

Tanins d’élevage

TANIPEPIN

Grape seed tannin for clarification, stabilisation and balance of red and rosé wines.

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